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How I use Twitter to find technical writing work

KB from London heard that I use Twitter to find work.

Like many of us, she thought Twitter was a waste of time and ignored it. Maybe we can change her mind.

How I use Twitter to find technical writing work

Here’s how I use it.

Create a twitter account for your business. Add a keyword into the title, for example, if you’re an accountant, call your twitter account @Accounting140 – accountancy tips in 140 characters.

Add links to your website in the profile. Add your business logo. It has to look professional. Go to oDesk and spend $100 on a nice new logo and design.

Learn how to create Twitter lists.

  • Create a list for people who have a lot of influence in your industry.
  • Create a list for people of your competitors.
  • Create a list for people who are generous, who retweet, and who are willing to help you if you help them.
  • Keep these lists private.

Next

Follow chats. Do a Google search for twitter chats related to your industry. Add the date to your calendar.

Ask questions. This works very well. Others are promoting themselves too hard. Instead, you ask questions about your line of business and help others.

Add one hashtag to every post/question. Don’t over do it.

Next

Do Searches. Here’s an example. Type the following into Twitter.

Excel ?

This returns tweets related to Excel from people with questions.

Question  = problems.

Change the text.

Excel pivot ?

Excel export ?

Excel freeze ?

Then answer these questions. If you have a site, send them there.

This works very well and takes little effort.

If you do this every day for ten minutes:

People start to follow you.

People add your account to their, usually public, lists.

They start asking you questions.

You’re seen as an expert. You can encourage them to visit your site, see your services, and connect.

Ten minutes a day. Try it.

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5 UK Technical Writers You Should Follow on Twitter

From Shakespeare, Graham Greene, JK Rowling to Colum McAndrew, Ellis Pratt, David Farbey. All have all one thing in common – great writing! As my career started in the Baker Street, London in the 90s, I’ve always carried fond memories of my time in England. Here are some UK based technical writers you might want to add to your Twitter list. By the way, do you notice any difference between UK and US tech writer blogs? Continue reading 5 UK Technical Writers You Should Follow on Twitter

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7 Ways for Technical Writers to Re-invent Themselves & Demonstrate their Value

You’ve just been fired. The Technical Writing Dept is closed. What do you do?  This is a fact of life for many people today. Indeed, there is now a real fear that US technical writers will continue to lose their jobs to offshore companies, e.g. India & Poland. And it’s true; it’s the shape of things to come, I’m afraid. But rather than moan about it, let’s look at what you can do to re-invent yourself and find new, lucrative opportunities. Continue reading 7 Ways for Technical Writers to Re-invent Themselves & Demonstrate their Value

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Top 50 Technical Writers on the Web

I’ve made a list of the top 50 technical writers with a web presence. Some of these you might know, such as Darren Barefoot and Tom Johnson. I have also added some other writers from India, Russia and Israel to reach out to a wider audience. I’m sure there are others that I’ve missed. Let me know and I’ll update the list.

This week’s new additions include Alan Houser, Char James-Tanny, Cheryl Locket-Zubak , Colum McAndrew, Joe Welinske, Michael Hughes, and Paul Mueller.

Continue reading Top 50 Technical Writers on the Web